Beaver Ranch Park Forest Management

Beaver Ranch Park is currently undergoing a forest management procedure.  This is being done on the Beaver Ranch Park property which is owned by Jefferson County Open Space.  JCOS is fully supportive of this process and has given permission to these “core participants” to complete this project. Please click HERE for an in depth look at the Beaver Ranch Master Plan.

CORE PARTICIPANTS:  the Upper South Platte Partnership, which includes Denver Water, the Nature Conservancy, the Colorado State Forest Service, the Coalition for the Upper South Platte, the Jefferson Conservation District, the Natural Resources Conservation Service, the U.S. Forest Service, the American Forest Foundation and the Colorado Forest Restoration Institute and Wildland Urban Interface Center at Colorado State University. 

CUSP website: http://cusp.ws

USPP website: http://uppersouthplattepartnership.org/

PURPOSE:  To address the issues of forest overgrowth, forest stand decadence, disease, and high risk of insect infestation and wildfire; the project managers have chosen to use techniques that are jointly referred to as: forest restoration.  Forest restoration seeks to address multiple issues in a single “treatment”.  By reducing tree numbers, yet maintaining clusters, or groups with thick canopy coverage, we aim to reduce fire risk while simultaneously preserving and even improving wildlife habitats.  We are aiming to restore dominance of different tree species in different areas, such as northern slopes or open fields.  The creation of meadows is an important goal that gives habitat to wildlife that has been “squeezed out” by encroaching forest canopy cover (elk, for example).   We are placing an emphasis on restoring the groves of aspen that are being overtaken by conifers.  We are removing trees with disease, such as dwarf mistletoe.  The end goal is to achieve a more open forest with parklands and areas of dense forest which will be important habitat for species like the goshawk.

The area previously mitigated in 2011 along the Elk Ridge Trail will be re-masticated during this project.